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How can you prevent a miscarriage?

My wife is pregnant. She has had two miscarriages. I want to know what we can do to prevent another one. Her doctor doesn't seem to think there's anything we can do. But I do not think so. What kind of steps can we take to make sure that our baby is safe all the way through?
A miscarriage is also known as spontaneous abortion that occurs in about one third of all pregnancies-usually before the woman misses her menstrual period or recognizes that she was pregnant. Nearly all of miscarriages occur before 12 weeks of gestation and about one in five recognized pregnancies ends up in a miscarriage. About half of all miscarriages occur secondary to chromosomal errors in the fetus which are incompatible with life. Therefore, your wife's doctor is essentially correct to say that these miscarriages can't be prevented. We also know that miscarriages can be induced by a variety of other factors which includes infection in the pelvis, especially pelvic inflammatory disease or appendicitis, hormonal irregularities, uterine abnormalities, incompetent cervix, inflammatory bowel disease (i.e., Crohn's and ulcerative colitis, congenital heart disease, severe kidney disease, diabetes, thyroid disease, autoimmune disorders like lupus, lifestyle factors such as smoking, alcohol, street drugs and severe malnutrition). There are many medications that are not safe for use during pregnancy (all should be listed according to class of safety). As well getting general anesthesia for surgery can also induce labor and possible miscarriages. Many of these conditions can actually be modified and possibly prevent a miscarriage. For example, a person might improve the chance of carrying a pregnancy to term by cutting out tobacco, illicit drugs, and alcohol, maintaining good nutrition, and optimizing her pre-existing medical condition. I would suggest a follow up with a primary care physician who can review your wife's medical history and may refer her to an OB/GYN for infertility treatment if warranted.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
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