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Why do I have so much mucous in my nose and throat?

I don't have any kind of cold symptoms but I always seem to have a lot of mucous in my nose and throat. What is going on? Why would I have this mucous build up with no other symptoms?
The presence of mucus in the nose and throat is necessary. It moistens and cleans the nasal membranes, humidifies air, traps and clears inhaled foreign objects or infectious agents (i.e., fungi, bacteria and virus), and fights infection. The average human body produces about a liter of mucus per day. Normally, you don't notice all that mucus because it drips down the back of your throat and you swallow it. Only when your body produces more thin mucus, or the mucus is thicker than usual that it becomes more noticeable. This increased mucus production in the nose and throat could be a sign and symptom of many common illnesses that include common cold, influenza, allergies, asthma, sinusitis, chronic bronchitis, deviated septum, cold temperatures or excess dryness in the air, and certain foods or medications (including birth control pills and blood pressure medications). Is your nose and throat discharge thin and watery, or is it thick? Is it bloody? What color is it? How long has it been present? Has it been present all the time? As you know, nasal mucus is normally clear and thin. During times of infection, it can change color to yellow or green either as a result of trapped bacteria or due to your body's reaction to viral infection. Mucus build-up is also caused by cystic fibrosis with extremely thick production of mucus that is difficult to expel. However, sometimes the problem is not that you are producing too much mucus, but that it's not being cleared away effectively. For instance, swallowing problems can cause a buildup of liquids in the throat. I would suggest a visit with a primary care physician to have your condition checked out and establish a diagnosis so that you can be treated appropriately.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under ZocDoc’s Terms of Service.

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