ZocdocAnswersI have had an extremely sore place on the top of my head for a few months. What could it be?

Question

I have had an extremely sore place on the top of my head for a few months. What could it be?

Right above my forehead, on the top of my head, I have a dime sized area that is extremely tender and sore to the touch. Enough so that I can barely put any pressure at all on it. It has been this way for at least 3 months. I've wondered if maybe I just hit my head on something that I don't remember, but this pain has been there for such a long time that I'm not sure that could be the case. I'm starting to get really worried.

Answer

I would definitely recommend that you have this checked out by your primary care doctor. Any persistent skin problems like this need to be evaluate by a doctor to make sure that this is not something serious and also to help you figure out what treatment might be needed. As you have already mentioned, a hard bump to the top of the head might result in a sore or bruise that could take a long time to heal. However, since you can't recall any episode of trauma, I do agree that this seems a bit less likely. There are several other skin-specific issues, however, that your doctor can evaluate for. For example, seborrheic dermatitis or psoriasis of the scalp are both chronic inflammatory conditions of the scalp that can cause areas of tenderness or irritation that, in the absence of treatment, can persist for a very long time. Also, fungal infections of the scalp can often cause chronic sore areas. If your doctor finds any evidence of one of these conditions, they will be able to prescribe an appropriate medication, such as a topical steroid cream or topical anti fungal cream, to help clear things up. See your doctor as soon as you can!

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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