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Random leg pain for over a year - what is it?

Started in the back of my knee, has moved to my entire leg. Im a 20 year old female. When I was 17 i started intense running. I worked out at least once a day for two yrs straight. I was able to run 90 mins with no problems. A little over a year ago I started experiencing pain in the back of my knee. To this day the pain has not gone away. I visited several Drs, they said it was runners knee. I went to physical therapy and continue to do their exercises. The pain goes away for a day or two but then comes back worse then before. For about the last 6 months the pain travels throughout my leg and lower back, it hits my ankles, my shins, the back of my knees, everywhere. It hurts to walk, let alone run. I love running and would do anything to get back in the game. Can somebody please help me??? it would be greatly greatly appreciated.
I am very sorry to hear that this is such a persistent issue for you! You should certainly see a joint specialist right away. And unfortunately, knee pain like yours is typically related to running and an active lifestyle. To start with, it may be a good idea to avoid running or other high impact exercise until you can have the knee reevaluated by a doctor. Continuing to run on an inflamed knee may only keep the symptoms going and could potentially result in permanent damage to the knee. I recommend seeing a doctor specialized in knee pain and knee problems, such as an orthopedic doctor or a sports medicine doctor. Runner's knee is still probably the most likely possibility. But I think it is important to rule out other causes, such as a Baker's cyst behind the knee, or damage directly to the knee meniscus or ligaments surrounding the knee. Based on what the orthopedic doctor or sports medicine doctor finds, they may recommend additional imaging of the knee (such as an MRI), as well as leg strengthening exercises, continued physical therapy, and avoidance of certain types of exercise. Good luck!
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
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