ZocdocAnswersKidney stone and hemorrhoids - what is happening?

Question

Kidney stone and hemorrhoids - what is happening?

Hi, last Sunday I had back pain and abdominal pain. It was really bad. I called my Dr. Whom I work for. We knew about the kidney stones because of hematuria and scans. It took 3 weeks for them to start moving. My left kidney still hurts and the urge to go potty is still there. It doesn't feel like razors but more of I can get safication when I potty it hurts. I've told her about this and I feel like there is still something going on. I was told to Keep taking my antibotics and this dye in my urine that does not do anything for me! I'm so tried I can't keep my eyes open. On top of that I woke up this morning with hemariods and don't know why? I have sjogerns syndrome if that helps but basically what now do I go see someone else? I just don't want my kidneys to fail or anything like that I just want relief! Or is pain going potty still normal... With a stone moving reminding you I have not found it yet? I had two one size 4 and 3. Thanks so much!

Answer

I would definitely touch base with your doctor again. Sometimes, with kidney stones, it can take quite a while for them to move out of the system. However, after so many weeks, I would have expected things to have taken their course. If you are still having symptoms, it is important to reevaluate to make sure there is not a stone that is too large to pass, which can happen sometimes. This is important to catch because, as you say, the pressure of the urine backing up behind the stone can sometimes damage the kidney. It is usually easy enough to tell if there is still a stone present with a combination of urine and blood tests and, perhaps, a repeat scan such as an ultrasound or CT scan of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder. Also, given that you have burning pain with urination, I think it is important to reevaluate to see whether or not you have an ongoing urine infection that, potentially, is not being cleared up by the antibiotics you are taking. You should start by consulting the primary care doctor that you are currently seeing. Depending on your symptoms, they may want input from a specialist, such as a urologist.

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