ZocdocAnswersWhy does my finger still hurt after stubbing it a month and a half ago?

Question

Why does my finger still hurt after stubbing it a month and a half ago?

About a month and a half ago I stubbed my finger while playing basketball. I stubbed it on someones arm. The swollen went away after 2-3 days and the finger was fully functional, but I did notice when I bent it and pushed down on my finger it hurt. After a month a half the pain still exists. I thought I would just tough it out to see if it would stop, but the same amount of pain is still there. Is there any solutions?

Answer

I am sorry to hear that you are having pain still after this injury! A "stubbed finger" is a common way of describing a sprain involving one of the fingers. A sprain, basically, is an injury to one or more of the ligaments in the finger. Symptoms include swelling, pain, and stiffness. Because ligaments contain very little blood supply, healing is very slow. Sometimes more severe sprains may take months to heal completely. I recommend that you go to see your primary care doctor about this issue, since you now have had symptoms for 6 weeks. They can examine your finger and make sure there are no signs of a ligament tear, fractured bone that has healed poorly, or any other complication that might require medical intervention. If not, it may just be that this is going to take some more time to heal! Regardless, your doctor can give you some recommendations on which medications you can take to reduce pain and swelling. The also may recommend splinting or otherwise immobilizing the finger to further promote healing. In rare cases where healing is not occurring, they may recommend referral to a specialist, such as an orthopedic doctor. Please make an appointment today!

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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