ZocdocAnswersCan a thyroglossal duct cyst be the cause of my excessive sweating?

Question

Can a thyroglossal duct cyst be the cause of my excessive sweating?

Whenever it gets hot, I begin profusely sweating. Yesterday, I was outside for about 5 minutes and had sweat pouring down my face (it wasn't that hot). Whenever I exercise, the sweating is almost unbearable. I found out recently that I have a thyroglossal duct cyst - can this be the cause of the sweating? I've likely had this cyst for many years...my last bloodwork was about a year and a half ago and my thyroid levels were fine.

Answer

A thyroglossal duct cyst is an interesting remnant from fetal development that occurs in some people. Basically what happens is that, in the fetus the thyroid gland migrates down a channel from around the tongue towards the neck. When this channel does not complete go away afterwards, a thyroglossal duct cyst can result. A thyroglossal duct cyst is a very benign condition, so I suspect that your sweating is not related to this. Consequently it would be a good idea for you to go see your primary care doctor at your earliest convenience; they can help you decide what might be going on. Sometimes profuse sweating can be related to an overactivity of the thyroid gland. This seems less likely in your cases, given that you recently had normal thyroid tests done, however if you have any other evidence of a thyroid problem, your doctor will likely want to recheck these levels to make sure. Another common condition which causes profuse sweating is hyperhydrosis, which is a genetic predisposition to have over active sweat glands. Again, this is a diagnosis that your doctor could consider and confirm and, if present, help you decide whether treatment with topical or oral medications was necessary.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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