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How serious is microvascular ischemic brain disease?

Hospitalized for dizziness/woozy, balance and coordination problem, Diagnosed with Microvascular Ischemic brain Disease - severe. Had hemmoratic stroke 10 years ago. On walker and in home physical therapy. Dizziness gone and balance/coordination is much better. Take Metformin, Lipitor, Torporal Xl, Diovan, Lasix, Zoloft. HAve diabetis, high cholesterol, high blood pressure (Under control). Now that I feel better is disease under control or maybe even gone. If not will I once again have these problems. My physician does not want to see me for 4 month. In hospital, he told my daughter and I that was incurable but now on office visit acts like nothing is wrong with me. I am confused Thank you very much
Microvascular ischemic brain disease is a fancy medical term for saying that you have suffered multiple tiny strokes throughout your brain. This is a common problem in people who have lots of complex medical problems like you do, such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Unfortunately, the damage from the microvascular brain disease is not curable or reversible, although that does not mean there is nothing you can do. First, you can continue to work on physical therapy and rehabilitation, which will help to return you to as high a level of functioning as possible. Second, you can control the medical problems that contribute to developing future strokes. In particular, keeping your cholesterol, diabetes, and high blood pressure tightly controlled is critical to preventing future events. You should discuss this plan and your concerns with your primary care doctor. They will want to see you every few months to make sure that these conditions are under control and that you are taking your medications as indicated without any problems. Good luck!
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
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