ZocdocAnswersI tested positive for a bacterial UTI and have begun to develop bumps. What is this?

Question

I tested positive for a bacterial UTI and have begun to develop bumps. What is this?

The bumps are on my labia majora one was large and painful. I started washing everytime after urination because of the painful burning sensation and stopped three days later when the burning wasn't so bad. Later that same evening I developed three more bumps one large and painful. Could this be from the UTI or is it more likely something else.I have never had a UTI before or any bumps and I only have had sex with my husband who is faithful. These bumps are down low from my urethra to just below the vagina and they are not clustered together. The pain of first onset of bumps subsided within three days and have gone down in size where I can't feel them but I can still see where they were. My UTI sympoms started nine days ago and the first set of bumps stated five days ago and the second set is only two days ago. I started antibiotic treatment five days ago.

Answer

Urinary tract infections do not typically cause bumps to form inside or around the vagina. For that reason, it would be best to make an appointment with your OB GYN doctor or with your primary care doctor so that they can take a look for you. One possibility is that you could have a local irritation reaction of the skin in this area from the frequent urination, or even from the frequent washing. Irritation reactions of the skin have a pretty typical appearance and will be easy for your doctor to diagnose with just a quick look. It will also be important to rule out genital herpes, which is a viral infection of the genitals. This infection can cause burning with urination that might be mistaken for a urinary tract infection. Importantly, it can also cause blisters to form in and around the vagina which are often quite painful. This might explain the bumps that you are seeing. Finally, these could be small cysts, which commonly form in women in this area of the genitals. Occasionally the cysts can be infected and inflamed enough that they require specific treatment, such as by drainage. Start by making an appointment with your doctor at your earliest convenience.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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