ZocdocAnswersWhy am I always lightheaded?

Question

Why am I always lightheaded?

I am a teenage girl. Every morning when I get out of the bed, I become lightheaded. But it usually passes. When I get out of the shower I usually become so lightheaded that I start to black out and have to sit down for a few minutes. Afterwards I feel extremely fatigued. This also happens when I blow dry my hair and when I run. This has been going on for as long as I can remember. Is this normal?

Answer

There are lots of different things that can cause dizziness. Some of them are serious whereas others are not. However, it is important to have a doctor evaluate you, since this is a persistent problem and is not getting better. The first thing that your doctor will want to rule out is that this is not a problem with your heart, as that is one of the most serious causes of recurrent dizziness. In addition to performing an examination, they may want to get additional testing, such as an electrocardiogram, or electrical tracing of your heart. Also, make sure to tell your doctor if you have any other symptoms, such as chest pain, palpitations, fainting with exercise, or a family history of heart problems, as this information will be important for decision making. The most common cause of dizziness in someone your age is vasovagal syncope. This is a condition in which the veins in the legs pool blood, usually in response to some stimulus (such as fatigue, stress, temperature extremes, etc). This condition is generally benign and is usually managed by staying well hydrated and making sure that you change positions slowly. However, before calling this vasovagal syncope, other more serious causes need to be ruled out. See your primary care doctor as soon as you can!

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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