ZocdocAnswersI got punched in the face several times; should I see a doctor?

Question

I got punched in the face several times; should I see a doctor?

My friend decided in our drunk argument to pound on my face. I have some bruising around my eye, slight bruising on the side of my nose, swelling from the bottom of my eye side of my nose and cheek. I had a lot of numbness the day after, only slight numbness around my temple. Although from the top left and next few teeth on are completely numb. It hurts now when I chew. There is no problem with me moving my facial muscles. Is it swelling of my nerve. Should I go to the doctor?

Answer

You should definitely go to see your primary care doctor about this issue as soon as possible. The two main issues that need to be ruled out with facial trauma like this are that, first, you haven't broken any bones in the face and, second, that you haven't damaged the eyes in any way. The numbness that you are experiencing is particularly concerning to me. It could be swelling around one of the small nerves in the face causing the numbness and, if so, this should improve as the swelling goes down. However, this could also be a fracture of a facial bone compressing a nerve root, which would obviously be more serious. Your doctor will be able to perform a careful examination of your facial injuries, paying close attention to your vision or other signs of damage to the eyes, as well as looking for any evidence of a bony fracture. If there is any concern for a fracture, they will probably want to send you to get x-rays of the face or, potentially, a CT scan of the face. The findings from these radiologic studies will help determine whether you need evaluation by a specialist. Begin by booking with your primary care doctor immediately.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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