ZocdocAnswersDo I have Multiple Sclerosis?

Question

Do I have Multiple Sclerosis?

20 year old Female 104lbs 4'8 I have been experiencing the following symptoms: Numbness in my feet, pelvic area, and left shoulder blade.(feet&blade happen all the time, pelvic once) Fatigue, Lack sex drive ,Memory loss My eyes move back in forth like REM sleep but when im awake Tremors (arm jerking uncontrollably and also my hands when I am typing , and legs when sitting) Happens once per week Constipation, Back pain, Anxiety and depression, Headache Major medical history : Diagnosed with a tumor in June 2008 On my spine the doctors said it is a osteioid osteoma or bone tumor. I have had two surgeries to remove the tumor. But both were unsuccessful. I still have major low back pain and for some reason back pain everywhere else. I also have scholiosis at about 18%( whatever that means) I have researched and everything points to Multiple Sclerosis but I am hoping maybe it sounds like something different. I have an appointment with a neurologist but it is in February 2nd

Answer

I recommend that you make an appointment with a neurologist to discuss this issue. Multiple sclerosis, as you probably know from your research on the internet, is a condition in which the insulating myelin sheath around nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord breaks down. This can cause a wide range of neurological symptoms, including some of those you mention, such as areas of numbness and tingling, weakness, and tremors. Classically, multiple sclerosis is a cyclical condition, in the sense that symptoms may tend to get better and then worse from time to time. It does sound like you have a very complex medical history. Some of your symptoms may be compatible with multiple sclerosis. However, you have other conditions which might be causing some of your symptoms, including the osteoid tumor in your back, and your depression. I do think a visit with a neurologist is a good idea. If they suspect multiple sclerosis, they will probably want to get an MRI of the brain to confirm or rule out that diagnosis. In the meantime, however, I think that working with your primary care doctor or other regular doctors on some of your other medical issues, especially the back pain and the depression, would be a good idea, as those conditions are no doubt contributing to the overall picture.

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