ZocdocAnswersDoes Levitra affect my health over time?

Question

Does Levitra affect my health over time?

Hey there, well i'm 27 years old male, having a really great sexual life with my partner, but sometimes i come really fast in about 8-10 minutes, and it took me around 15 minutes to have full erection again and it really drives me mad and shy at the same time, so i asked some friends and they told me that they are taking Levitra pills. now i'm taking the 20 mg pill but i cut it to 4 pieces, so i only take 5 mg once per week, and it really helped me with my girl. my question is: does taking this dosage can affect my future health? and is it okay to take it once per week (5 mg)? and if not what is the replacement thing to do to stay erected after ejaculating? please i need a prompt answer from an expert. regards

Answer

The way that you are using Levitra is not appropriate. I would recommend discontinuing this practice immediately, and going instead to see your doctor for advice. Levitra is a medication that is used to treat erectile dysfunction. However, you do not have erectile dysfunction. You have no trouble getting an erection or maintaining one, and therefore Levitra is not an appropriate medication for you. What you have, instead, is a problem ejaculating earlier than you want to. After ejaculation it is normal to not be able to have a full erection immediately, and you should not use medications to enhance the speed with which you are able to achieve a second erection. Rather, you should focus on the premature ejaculation. This could include changing your sexual technique to slow down or pace out stimulation to prevent early ejaculation. You could also consider using condoms, which may help decrease sensation a bit so that you can hold off a bit longer. If these strategies do not work, your doctor could also refer you and your partner to a sex therapist, if you feel that might be helpful. However, you should definitely stop using the Levitra pills as you are currently doing and only use them as directed by a doctor.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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