ZocdocAnswersWhy do I have pressure in my ear all the time?

Question

Why do I have pressure in my ear all the time?

I had pressure in my ear for like a year now and its getting worst and i went to a EnT doctor. He examine my ear and told me i had inflammation and its coming from my enlarged tonsils that have to be removed to get relief. I have had tonsil problems when i was like younger but haven't had it since and am now im 22 but is this really my tonsils? My tonsil don't hurt until i get a infection from time to time but the discomfort in my ear is annoying and it gets hooked up with my breathing sometimes. He told me they have to come out but I'm wondering is this my tonsils being enlarge causing this and if so how can i get a little relief until i have money to get them removed?

Answer

Your ENT doctor is probably correct that this pressure in your ears is from enlarged tonsils, if that is what the physical examination showed. Basically, what happens is that the small tubes (called eustachian tubes) that equalize pressure and drain fluid from the middle ear to the back of the throat become compressed by the enlarged tonsils, since they exit directly behind the tonsils in the back of the throat. This caused trouble with fluid and pressure buildup in the ears, which is called eustachian tube dysfunction. If the only cause is recurrent tonsil infections or persistent tonsil enlargement, then surgery is definitely the best option to relieve the problem. At the same time, it may be that you have other additional problems that are contributing to the eustachian tube dysfunction. These might include either chronic sinus congestion or chronic nasal allergies. It might be worth talking with your primary care doctor to rule out these two conditions, because these are easily treated with simple medications. Treatment might provide some relief while you are considering whether or not you want to go ahead and proceed with surgery. Book an appointment with your primary care doctor for some more advice, and good luck!

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