ZocdocAnswersShould I be worried about my kidneys if my mother and grandmother had polycystic kidney disease?

Question

Should I be worried about my kidneys if my mother and grandmother had polycystic kidney disease?

The Polycystic kidney disease ended in renal failure and death for my mom and grandmother had one kidney leading to heart problems from strain causing her death. In 2009 CT showed 2 cm cyst on my right kidney and one on my ovary. At times my skin is almost transparent or thin and you can see these white criss-crossing patterns all over - they are raised looking like I have uneven skin these look like the models of ligaments and muscles you see on skeletons in any medical book or website. My polar seems to turn a pale kinda grayish yellow a weird color. I cannot find anything anywhere that fits this description.

Answer

It sounds like you have had some changes or concerning findings with your health recently, in addition to the family history of polycystic kidney disease. There are several reasons why the best thing for you to do right now is to see your primary care physician (or set up an appointment with a new one, if you don't have one) so that you can go over both your family history as well as your current symptoms to take the best care of your health. Polycystic kidney disease can be inherited in what is called an autosomal dominant fashion, which means any child of an affected parent has a 50% chance of being affected by the disease. Given that your mother had the illness and you have a known cyst in your kidney, it will be important to screen you for the disease so that you can be treated and followed by a nephrologist so that you don't develop renal failure unexpectedly. In addition, patients with PKD are also prone to other adverse health issues, so it will be important to discuss screening options with your physician. Secondly, if you are having skin changes, particularly color changes, it will be important to be evaluated by your physician so you can undergo a thorough physical exam and possibly some laboratory testing. Overall this is the best way to protect your health!

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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