ZocdocAnswersWhat could be causing intense, constant mid-cycle cramping in my uterus?

Question

What could be causing intense, constant mid-cycle cramping in my uterus?

Just over the past 48 hours, I have been experiencing a near constant stream of uterine cramping. I typically only have a 28 day cycle, and on the night of day 13 I began getting dull period like cramps. Not only have I never had mid-cycle cramping, but this has literally continued non-stop for the past day and a half, two days, with maybe a small break for a half an hour or so but then picks back up. Last night they were so intense and painful that it was almost crippling, especially when sitting. Also, yesterday I was slightly nauseous off and on all day, especially at night when the cramping worsened. I did have unprotected sex exactly one week ago and he did not pull out. I have been told that implantation cramping can sometimes be prolonged, but I have not heard of it potentially being so painful at times. What are the possible reasons for such random and prolonged cramping?

Answer

It sounds like you have been experiencing some very unpleasant symptoms in the last few days. In any situation when your health changes or you have new symptoms, it is always a good idea to see your physician to make sure you protect your health. If you did have unprotected sex within the last several days to weeks, it is certainly possible that the cramping you are experiencing is related to pregnancy. Even if it is not, you may still be pregnant (and the cramping is the result of something else). To make sure that you are able to manage a potential pregnancy and consider all of your options, it is important to know as soon as possible whether you are in fact pregnant or not. With regard to the cramping, it is possible that you may have an ovarian cyst. This can cause intense and painful cramping. Depending upon your age, you may also have a uterine fibroid which can also sometimes be painful. Both fibroids and ovarian cysts can generally be visualized with a pelvic ultrasound. In addition, painful cramping that is cyclical can also be a sign of endometriosis. It is important to see your physician as he or she will definitely want to go over your health history, associated symptoms, and likely perform a pelvic exam with possible ultrasound to help determine what is causing your symptoms.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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