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What is a Good Technique for Taking the Glaucoma Test?

I have a real problem with anything getting near my eyes. Well, the problem is really only there when I can see something coming at my eye or if I know something is going to come near my eye. This makes taking any kind of eye drops difficult. It also makes it a practical impossibility to get the glaucoma test done at my optometrist's office during my annual exam. I don't think I've ever successfully completed one of those tests. The image of that lighted probe coming closer and closer to my eye is too much and I always blink or back away. I can't even do the glaucoma test where they blow air on your eye because they tell me it's coming ahead of time. I know I need to actually get the glaucoma test eventually to make sure my eyes are totally healthy. Any suggestions for doing it?
The first recommendation I have is to talk about this issue with your optometrist in advance, explaining that you have anxiety about the exam and have had trouble completing it in the past. It may be that your optometrist will be able to walk you through the examination, perhaps by letting you know step by step what is going on so you don't get anxious, or by distracting you with small talk. Most people who have anxiety about the examination are able to get through it just fine with these simple strategies. In more severe cases, especially where the test is medically very important (for example, if you have diabetes or another condition that puts you at high risk of eye problems), then it may be necessary to involve your primary care doctor. Your primary care doctor may be willing to prescribe you a small one time dose of an anti-anxiety medications so that you can get through the test. This would not be unlike the prescription of these medications for those with a bad fear of flying who need to travel by airplane. Start with talking to your optometrist, however, to see what they recommend that you do. Good luck!
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

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