ZocdocAnswersMy sister kicked me in the tailbone, what should I do?

Question

My sister kicked me in the tailbone, what should I do?

It hurts when i sit, run, walk ,bend, ect.

Answer

Injuries to the tailbone area are extremely common because it is at the back of the buttocks, making it a very common area to fall down on, bump, or otherwise injure. I recommend getting a full evaluation by your doctor, especially if your injury does not get better and/or your pain becomes worse. There are two bones in the area the most people commonly call their tailbone, called the sacrum and the coccyx. These are actually continuations of the spinal column, but the spinal cord actually ends before it gets to either of these bones. Although some other nerves pass through the sacrum, the coccyx is very small and not even hollow. It takes a significant amount of energy (like a fall from a height greater than 6 feet or a car accident) to break a healthy young person's sacrum, so this is probably not the case for you. However, the only way to be sure is to visit your primary care doctor. The coccyx can be broken more easily, but this is actually inconsequential because a broken coccyx requires no treatment and always heals just fine on its own. You may be suffering from a deep bruise to your sacrococcygeal region, or at worst a fractured coccyx. If this is the case, this is a painful injury, but fortunately it should heal well on its own within a few weeks. You should rest the area, apply ice, and take over the counter pain relievers such as ibuprofen. Again, if your injury does not begin to feel better, your pain becomes severe, or you have difficulty walking, visit a primary care doctor for a complete evaluation to make sure you don't have a more serious injury.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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