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Why is one area on the white part of my eye discolored?

I am a female in my early 50s, and recently, I have noticed that one area of my eye has become discolored. The area is about the size of the end of a pencil eraser, and it is located on the white part of my right eye. Rather than being white like the rest of my eye, this discolored area is grayish. There is no pain in my eye, and I do not have any other symptoms that appear to be related to this problem. Is this eye discoloration a normal, common part of aging, or do you think that it may indicate a medical issue that required a doctor's attention?
It sounds like you may have a nevus on the surface of your eye. A nevus is commonly known as a "mole" and it's a collection of pigment containing cells called melanocytes. A nevus or mole in the eye is very similar to a nevus or mole anywhere else on the skin and doesn't necessary indicate a serious problem. That being said, it would be important to have your regular eye doctor or primary care doctor take a look at the spot, because there is no way to confirm this diagnosis over the internet! Also, rarely, a mole or nevus may be a risk factor for the development of a serious type of cancer known as melanoma. This is especially the case if the nevus is new (meaning, not present earlier in your life), or if it is rapidly growing or has irregularities in terms of either its border or color distribution. Your doctor will be able to take a look at the area to see if there is any concern for melanoma. If so, you will definitely need to have the area biopsied to rule out this possibility. Regardless, the first step is to call and make an appointment with your doctor!
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.