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Will I ever regain vision in my eye from a mini-stroke?

My mom was getting ready to pass. I was sitting in her hospital room, and I had been crying a lot. After one of my emotional episodes, I noticed that the eyesight in my left eye was wavy, and had black patches in it. I thought it was due to crying. After the funeral, my vision was not any better. I went to retina specialist that said that I had a mini-stroke in my left eye, and the black patches were blood. Laser treatments cleared up the blood, and steroid shots in the eye to improved the vision. I had to discontinue the shots because the charge was $160 cash, and Medicare would not cover the cost. The vision has still not improved. Will I ever regain normal vision in my left eye since I had this mini-stroke?
I'm so sorry to hear about the loss of your mother and then your own health difficulties in that context. A stroke involving the vision can be very unsettling. It is good to hear that the laser treatments had some benefit, but it is unfortunate that you have not been able to recover your complete vision in that L eye. In general, when there is a deficit from a stroke the deficit can sometimes slowly resolve with time, but it is equally possible that you may have a permanent deficit, similar to people who have a stroke that affects their strength in an arm or leg for many years thereafter. The key in this situation is to seek further follow-up with an ophthalmologist for a follow-up evaluation to assess the degree of improvement as well as the depth of the current deficit. Your doctor's office (or perhaps another office) may be able to discuss financial assistance with you so that your can afford further steroid injections if those are felt to be indicated and possibly helpful with regard to your vision. An eye specialist will be able to give you the best sense of whether or not you can expect continued improvement. Hopefully you will continue to see some improvement in the future. It is also important that you discuss stroke prevention with your doctors">primary care physician so something like this doesn't happen again.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
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