Make an appointment:
Specialty
(i.e. Dermatologists)
Location

How will I be treated for Congestive Heart Failure if I experience side effects from Digoxin?

It is my understanding that I will need to take Digoxin to control the arrhythmia associated with my congestive heart failure. However, when I have taken Digoxin before, it had an opposite effect on my heart rate, making my heart feel like it was pounding out of my chest and skipping some beats. I have tried other heart medications, but they were not effective in keeping my heart rate under control, and caused my heart rate to drop below the normal levels. I know that there are many medications out there, and there has to be something in the pharmaceutical market that I can take that can control the heart rate issues and help me lead a somewhat normal life. What other drug options do I have that can control my heart rate?
Heart rhythm problems are very common. They are far more common in people who have congestive heart failure. Digoxin is a common medicine used for these conditions. I would strongly recommend you see a heart doctor to better understand your condition and treatment options. Digoxin is a medication that has may positive effects. It works to strengthen the heart muscle (decreasing congestive heart failure symptoms) as well as slow the heart (if the heart rhythm is going too fast). Skipping heart beats and pounding is not a common side effect of digoxin. Digoxin can cause nausea, vomiting or vision problems, but heart pounding is not one of them. Talk to your cardiologist for more information. I suspect that actually, your doctor gave you digoxin to help control an irregular heart beat. It is likely the irregular heart condition (and not the medicine) that caused your heart symptoms. It was likely the disease and not the medication. That being said, there are many other medications that can slow the heart rate and help strengthen the heart. These include medications in the beta blocker family -- most commonly metoprolol, carvedilol and bisoprolol. Talk to your heart doctor about these medications and your heart health. Good luck!
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

Other Cardiologists