ZocdocAnswersI started light spotting 7 days after I ended my period for 3 days. What could this be?

Question

I started light spotting 7 days after I ended my period for 3 days. What could this be?

I started getting spotting just 7 days after I ended my period. The spotting has gone on for 3 days, very lightly. Some was only noticeable when I wiped. Then yesterday I was fine. Today I noticed a brown discharge after I urinated. What could this be? I had sex the day before this happened, but I don\'t think that I could be pregnant. Plus I don\'t think it happens that fast. Could it be an infection? Or just left over blood from previous Menstrual Cycle. I read that can happen...Or could it be to ovulation? I've just never had this happen before. I have always been regular with my period every month since I was 12. I'm now 29.

Answer

I would recommend going to see your primary care doctor or your OB GYN doctor about this issue, especially if the symptoms persist. They will be able to examine you and help figure out what might be going on. The list of potential causes for the spotting that you are experiencing is long. This could be a urinary infection, which can cause a small amount of discharge or spotting, usually together with additional urinary symptoms, such as burning with urination or needing to urinate frequently. It could also be a vaginal infection, especially if there is itching or odor to the discharge that you are noting. The spotting could also be from ovulation, although it is a bit early for that, since ovulation typically occurs around two weeks after the period, especially in someone who has a history of very regular periods. I agree with you that pregnancy seems unlikely, although a pregnancy test might be something that your doctor recommends, just to be sure. It could also be breakthrough bleeding, which would be more likely if you were taking some form of contraception. I would recommend setting up a visit with your doctor, as they will be able to consider all these possibilities and get to the bottom of things.

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