ZocdocAnswersMy HIV test was negative but I don't feel well. What can I do?

Question

My HIV test was negative but I don't feel well. What can I do?

while doing(7/6/13) sex with a call girl my condom was broken i immediately leave the girl .but from next day im feeling itching or burning in my body...on 7th day after contact i made a test hiv rna pcr ..that was negative but im not feeling well..then on 28th day i made another test western bolt that was also negative..my dr. says u have not hiv.but im not feeling well.itching or burning are there and some stomach pain im felling ..plz help me wt can i do now..wt u think about my tests on 7th or 28 th day have some importance or not plz reply soon .....

Answer

This is an important concern to discuss with your primary care doctor. First, I should say that the symptoms you had within the first week or two of having intercourse is not likely HIV. Acute HIV (the illness that occurs initially) occurs usually within a few weeks of exposure and symptoms include fevers, sore throat, flu-like symptoms, and a few other symptoms. If you really want to rule out HIV, get the antibody test or PCR now and you will definitely be in the clear from that. Itching the next day after being in a different bed is more likely to be due to scabies or bed bugs. I think that is what I would get tested first. You should also be test for other STDs. A burning sensation can also be a symptom of genital herpes. I suggest that you schedule an appointment with a primary care doctor for STD testing. I think the Western blot that you had done on the 28th ruled out HIV, but if you need another piece of mind, then you can get the antibody test done now. You can also get tested for exposure to genital herpes (with an antibody test), and a urine test for chlamydia and gonorrrhea. In addition, your doctor should check you for bed bugs and scabies. Good luck.

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