ZocdocAnswersA blood vessel burst in my father's eye, what should I do?

Question

A blood vessel burst in my father's eye, what should I do?

a blood vessel burst into the eye of my father.He is also feeling head ache on the same side where vain in burst. He is also having difficulty in while talking to someone. what should i do please suggest something

Answer

The burst blood vessel you are describing sounds like a subconjunctival hemorrhage, which is the rupture of a small blood vessel on the white part of the eye. A blood vessel can burst as a result of any number of normal things that increase pressure in the body and strain the small blood vessels. Common, trivial occurrences that do this include sneezing, coughing, straining, crying, vomiting, rubbing your eyes and sometimes no particular causes. They often look quite alarming, but fortunately subconjunctival hemorrhages are rarely serious or a sign of an underlying medical problem. That being said, sometimes the burst blood vessels are associated with conjunctivitis, high blood pressure or diabetes, which is why I recommend consulting an opthalmologist. Most of the time, the treatment is simply observation. Subconjunctival hemorrhages usually clear up on their own without treatment, usually within 10 days. Pain is generally non-existent or minimal. Your father feels considerable pain or irritation in connection with it, but does it affect both sides? Does he have any allergies? He should consult an ophthalmologist to rule out glaucoma if there is pain in the eye as well as to see if he has other condition such as a bleeding disorder, high blood pressure or diabetes that can predispose to his subconjunctival hemorrhages.

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