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Severe lower abdominal pain, going on for 3 months. What should I do?

I've been having severe lower abdominal pains for about 2 months. First we thought it was some sort of bladder or kidney infection. After a week of pounding down the water/cranberry and still having pain I went to the doctor. After running urine and blood test we found out their was no infection. Doctor thought it could be a kidney issue so I went on some antibiotics and I was instructed to drink 8 to 9 bottles of water a day. A week later and still in pain I went back to the doctor. This time he thought maybe it had something to do with my uterus, Ovaries, or my bladder. I went through a ultrasound and they found nothing. Two months since this random pain started I'm still in severe pain. I'm 19 and I can't get a job or start college cause I'm doubles over in pain half the day. I haven't been able to have a good nights rest since it started. I've tried everything: Cold/Hot compresses, Pain pills, Antibiotics, change in diet, tons of water, tons of cranberry juice. Please help!
So sorry to hear about your concerns. Unfortunately, abdominal pain can be quite common for some people, and there are many different reasons or causes for it, which is why the best thing to do is to be evaluated by an OB/GYN surgeon. Most of them require an evaluation from a doctor, and sometimes time itself is one of the best things that helps a doctor to diagnose what is causing the problem. Many of the questions that your doctor may ask might involve what seems to make the pain better or worse, and if the pain seems in any way related to your menstrual cycle. Additionally, if anyone else in your family has had similar pain in the past. Some of these questions, among others, may give your doctor an idea about what could be causing your symptoms. Ultimately, however, you may need to see another physician. For many young women with abdominal pain, an OB/GYN surgeon is one of the best to evaluate this sort of problem because of their knowledge of the anatomy and their especial focus on women. Potential other causes include both GI problems as well as reproductive concerns (for example, irritable bowel syndrome or endometriosis, respectively). The best way to know is by visiting with your doctor and request a further evaluation if needed. Please speak with your doctor.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

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