ZocdocAnswersI have lower stomach pains, what could it be?

Question

I have lower stomach pains, what could it be?

Hi, I'm a 21 year old male at 180 lbs and I've been having lower stomach pains off and on for about 8 months now. I don't have health insurance so I can't see a physician about it. The pain occurs randomly usually before I eat or if I sit in a chair for a long time. It's worse when I wear belts because it adds more pressure to my lower stomach. It usually goes away when I use the restroom but I go twice a day. From what research I have done, is this a low magnesium problem or something else to do with my diet or is this something to do with my appendix?

Answer

Thank you for your question, and I am sorry to hear about these persistent symptoms. Unfortunately, it will not be possible to provide a diagnosis without an in-person evaluation. A physician would need to review your entire medical history and perform a physical exam, which is a crucial part of the evaluation. In addition, you may need other testing such as blood work or imaging studies. Only after collecting this information will it be possible to provide a diagnosis. Therefore, I strongly encourage you to schedule an appointment with a primary care doctor. Abdominal pain has many potential causes. It is possible you have a gastric or duodenal ulcer. Irritable bowel syndrome can lead to chronic abdominal pain, often accompanied by either diarrhea or constipation. Inflammatory bowel disease can disease pain, fever, and bloody diarrhea. Appendicitis typically causes fever and pain, although it typically does not persist for months. Diverticulitis can cause abdominal pain. This occurs due to inflammation around small outpouchings of the colon. Other causes of pain include ischemic bowel disease, mesenteric ischemia, and liver disease. Unfortunately, it will not be able to narrow this list of possibilities without more information. Again, I strongly encourage you to see a primary care physician.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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