ZocdocAnswersMy son has a high fever and is vomiting, what should I do?

Question

My son has a high fever and is vomiting, what should I do?

I hv a 4 ur old son.. He started complaining of a headache earlier this evening... We brought him home & by 9 his fever was at 101.2... We gave him Motrin ... Fever did not break....& spiked to 102.3... We gave him top care fever reducer .. His fe.. Fever broke... But quickly went back up... 1am I gave him a other tee spoon of top care... He threw up at 130... His fever is back up to 102.3... It's now 2 am... I dnt knw wht to do

Answer

So sorry to hear about your problem. Please speak with his doctor about this problem to make sure that he is well and gets well as soon as possible. There are an almost infinite number of possibilities that can cause a fever and vomiting in a child. The first, most obvious, explanation is a virus. These will often seem to come on suddenly and leave children quite weak. Usually, the best therapy for this sort of problem is supportive care, ie, making sure that he or she is drinking well, gets lots of rest, and time. Most kids will improve in fairly short order. After viruses, bacterial infections are another possibility, with ear infections being one obvious problem that kids will tend to have. Usually with an ear infection there is some sort of complaint about the ears, but not always. Sometimes antibiotics are needed, although your doctor can help decide if antibiotics are right in your specific situation. Many pediatricians offices will have someone available on call, meaning that you can call at all hours of night to help get the answer you need about whether or not you should go to the emergency department. Again, please speak with your doctor.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.