ZocdocAnswersHow long does it take a golf ball size hematoma to dissipate?

Question

How long does it take a golf ball size hematoma to dissipate?

It's been seven days today. I tripped over the dog fence and hit my head on cement. Did not loose conscious. Sat up and felt my head above my left eye. Had a bit of blood from the scrape which stopped bleeding pretty quick. Cleaned the golf ball size hematoma up and watched my face and forehead swell and turn black. All but the golf ball has pretty much dissipated. My question is should I be concerned about the golf ball tht hasn't dissipated. No other signs for exception of a little queeziness here and there.

Answer

Sorry to hear about your injury. It sounds like quite a serious fall, and I would point out that it is always best to discuss these things with your physician immediately after the injury occurs. There are too many unfortunate injuries that occur and go on to lead to serious complications down the line. In your specific instance, it sounds like things have returned to normal by your account except for the swelling where you hit your head. While it does take some time for a hematoma (a collection of blood under the skin) to resolve, if they are too big they can become infected or lead to other complications. There are some doctors that will tell patients that the body can resorb a certain amount of blood or other fluid on a daily basis, but this is very variable based on both the body part that is affected as well as many other factors, and it is difficult to extrapolate these rules out to all patients in traumatic injuries. Given the variability and the potential for further complications, as well as injuries that you may not have noticed since the fall, I would suggest that you please discuss this question with your doctor.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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