ZocdocAnswersCan you get pregnant with Mirena?

Question

Can you get pregnant with Mirena?

I've had a Mirena since March of 2012. I have always been B12 and Iron deficient and take supplements and injections. I'm not on any medications. About three weeks ago, when I was supposed to start my cycle, I only spotted a little. I was abnormally nauseous, which has continued when I am waking up. I am also abnormally sleepy, or I can't sleep at all. I have horrible nightmares, which I had both times I was pregnant before. I've put on about 3 lbs, but I've also been eating a lot of junk from cravings. I took a pregnancy test and it failed, as always (I was 6 mos. pregnant with my son and it still said negative!). Could it be a pregnancy with the Mirena?

Answer

The Mirena IUD is an extremely effective form of birth control. It is effective greater than 99% of the time. This means that the vast majority of the time when people think that they might be pregnant while on the Mirena IUD they are actually not pregnant at all. This is especially true in people that have negative pregnancy tests such as yourself. In addition, it is quite common for women to stop having their periods after they have the Mirena IUD for a certain amount of time. Usually it's around one year and thus it is not surprising at all that you have stopped having periods. However, if you are concerned then you definitely should schedule an appointment with your OB/GYN. This is because when people do get pregnant with the Mirena IUD there is a greater chance that the pregnancy will be ectopic (outside the uterus) which is a life-threatening condition. While you're at your OB/GYN's office you can take another pregnancy test just to confirm that you are not pregnant. In some cases, your doctor will want to perform a serum or blood pregnancy test just to confirm this fact. You can also discuss what pregnancy tests are best to buy, to make sure that you don't get a false negative. Good luck.

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