ZocdocAnswersWhen should I see a doctor about a fissure and an internal prolapsed hemorrhoid?

Question

When should I see a doctor about a fissure and an internal prolapsed hemorrhoid?

I've had a fissure for about a year now&it has gotten bigger. It's about the size of a quarter if not bigger.I'm experiencing light bleeding along with pain&discomfort. I also have what may be an internal prolapsed hemorrhoid about the size of a pea. I'm also experiencing frequent urination that irritates the area. I've been taking daily fiber drinks,exercising&drinking lots of water. I recently started doing the sits baths,but it has not helped&only relieves pain for a couple minutes. Should I keep doing what I'm doing or go see my physician?

Answer

I am sorry to hear that your fissure is not getting better. It sounds like you are following the right life style changes that could help with your condition. Since your fissure has not improved and you also have a possible prolapsed internal hemorrhoid, I would recommend that you see your physician soon. Fissures can cause a lot of irritation and discomfort that complicates your regular bowel movements. Pain and discomfort usually would cause your muscles to tighten up and cause more constipation. Tightening up your anal and pelvic muscles from your fissure causes internal pressure that can lead to more hemorrhoids. You also have some bleeding which overtime could cause iron deficiency, which could lead to anemia. You should see your physician to have your question prolapsed internal hemorrhoid to ensure that it indeed is what you describe it as. If it is a hemorrhoid, your physician can recommended simple interventions that could help shrink or remove the hemorrhoid. You also have light rectal bleeding which should be checked out. Rectal bleeding often can be from your hemorrhoids but if you have not seen your physician for over a year, you should have it checked out to be certain that it isn't anything serious. In the meantime, you should continue taking fiber, drinking fluids, and sitz baths.

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