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What is the best way to give a Lovenox shot to limit bleeding and how to stop bleeding if it occurs?

My father is on Lovenox to break up a Pulmonary Embolism. I have 2 questions, 1) Is there a trick/method to give the shot in a way that there is little to no bleeding, and 2) If there is bleeding, it seems to continue for quite some time as this is a blood thinner and one of the side effects. I just tried folding up a gauze pad to make it about a 1/2 inch thick and then taped that to the injection site and that seemed to stop the bleeding.
Thank you for your question and I recommend that you speak with your doctor about your concern. Lovenox (enoxaparin) is a very effective blood thinner that can be given to those who need it for one reason or another. If your father has a pulmonary embolus, that explains the need, as the blood thinner can help the body to "break up" the embolus and prevent it from growing--which could be a life threatening problem. Unfortunately, bleeding is one of the common problems from blood thinners. This bleeding can range from nuisance bleeding after a person gets a shot to more threatening and concerning bleeds in different body parts. Each of these need to be treated in the correct manner, which can sometimes require a doctor to help you get the care that you need, as some of these can be very worrisome. For mild bleeding after you give the shot, pressure is probably one of the best things that you can do, as this will help the body to clot off the site. Obviously, you may need to hold pressure for a minute or two, but you should discuss this problem with your doctor if it takes too much time for the bleeding to stop, as this could indicate a dosing problem. Please speak with your doctor.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.