ZocdocAnswersMy daughter had 20 percent of her lower intestine removed and appendix. Where can I find diet restrictions for her?

Question

My daughter had 20 percent of her lower intestine removed and appendix. Where can I find diet restrictions for her?

what is that procedure called and where can I find restrictions for her diet at?

Answer

Surgery to remove the small intestine can have multiple reasons, and you should speak with your doctor to understand why this surgery was performed. The last portion of the small bowel is called the ileum, and the appendix is attached to the first portion of the colon, called the cecum. When a patient has the terminal ileium and cecum removed, which includes the appendix, this procedure is called an ileocecectomy. The surgery is often performed in young patients with Crohn's disease, which tends to affect this region first and most severely. However, there are many other reasons to perform this resection, which can have different long term prognoses and consequences, which makes it paramount that you discuss this further your surgeon. Having said that, the terminal ileum is important for the absorption of intrinsic factor, an protein produced in the stomach that carries the vitamin B12. Therefore, B12 supplements are often required after this surgery. In addition, fats including triglycerides are absorbed in this portion of the bowel, therefore fat malabsorption can be a complication of this surgery. After this surgery, we generally think of dietary supplementation rather than restrictions, such as vitamins as mentioned above. Your surgeon or a dietitian who knows that details of your daughter's surgery should be able to provide you with the appropriate information to ensure that your daughter receives the appropriate nutrients.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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