ZocdocAnswersCan Amoxicillin and prednisone cure a peritonsillar abscess?

Question

Can Amoxicillin and prednisone cure a peritonsillar abscess?

I had the predisone and amoxicllin to treat strep like symptoms, which it did, but I was left with a peritonsillar abscess. The abscess was very large but decreased in size after taking the medicine

Answer

Sorry to hear that you have a peritonsillar abscess, and that you have questions about how to best manage it. I am happy to give you some information about the treatment of peritonsillar abscesses, but at the end of the day I am going to recommend that you make an appointment to be seen by an ENT or Ear Nose Throat physician (aka otolaryngologist) to get evaluated. Ultimately they are the specialist that will be able to best treat your peritonsillar abscess. All of us have different set of tonsils. You have something called adenoids which are like tonsils in the back of your nose, lingual tonsils which are tonsils on the back of your tongue, and pharyngeal tonsils (which are the tonsils in the back of your oropharynx which most people refer to as 'tonsils'). In a very small percentage of people (about 1%) that develop tonsillitis (a pharyngeal tonsil infection), the infection can spread into the space deep to the tonsils (called the peritonsillar space). When this happens, pus accumulated in the peritonsillar space, and the best way to manage it is to drain the abscess surgically. If it is very small, then treating it with antibiotics alone (without surgical drainage) can sometimes be sufficient. Adding steroids will often decrease the inflammation, and pain and therefore make it much more comfortable for the patient to swallow. Your ENT will be able to examine you and recommend which treatment is best for you. Best of luck.

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