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What to do for a boil that burst under the skin?

I had a boil on my inner thigh, it had a head and I tried to pop it, I've had tons of boils in my life, so this was common for me. I felt it pop under the skin, but it didn't register with me until later what had happened. I got the top off, but only a little bit of blood came out, so I've been treating it with hydrogen peroxide, neosporin, and tea tree oil. So far, nothing has changed over 2-3 days. It's still the same red as around the original boil, but it's more light pink, it's not hot, it's not throbbing, it's not noticeably painful unless I press, there are no red streaks, etc. I still feel like the boil core is there, but when I tentatively squeezed again, nothing happened. I want to go to the doctor, but I"m deathly afraid he'll want to cut my leg open, or inject me near the spot with antibiotic. I would just like oral antibiotics... But I don't know what to expect and I really don't want to go... What is normally done to people in my particular situation?
I am sorry to hear about your recurrent abscesses and the more recent one that has not healed. In order to receive proper therapy, you will need to schedule an appointment with a primary care doctor. Only after examining the area will it be possible to determine the best course of action. The doctor will also need to evaluate you to determine why you are suffering recurrent abscesses. An abscess, or boil, is caused by a bacterial infection in the soft tissues. The typical organisms involved are Staph and Strep species. As the infection moves from the superficial tissues to deeper tissues, the bacteria break down tissue, which leads to collections of pus. The abscesses often prevent your body's immune system from fully clearing the infection. In general, treatment requires a small incision to allow adequate drainage. Antibiotics are typically not sufficient, and there is controversy as to whether antibiotics are necessary at all. Without adequate drainage, the infection can progress and in severe situations can progress to the point where amputation is needed. Additionally, it is not normal for an individual to suffer multiple abscesses, and it is important to rule out an immune deficiency. I encourage you to schedule an appointment with a primary care doctor to discuss this.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

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