ZocdocAnswersWhat could a knot in leg possibly indicate?

Question

What could a knot in leg possibly indicate?

I have really bad varicose veins on both legs but my left leg is way more painful than my right leg. I have now developed a knot in my left leg below the knee area and to Athe right of said knee The area surrounding is swollen and sore.. What does this possibly indicate and should I see my regulat doctor or a doctor specilizing in varicose vein complication.

Answer

Thank you for your question and I am sorry to hear about the symptoms you are having in your leg. I would recommend that you meet with your primary care physician for further evaluation, but here are some general thoughts. First, the location of the "knot" that you feel may indicate a muscular problem, a joint problem, a skin problem, or a problem in the veins themselves. If this is a muscle spasm or cramp, you would likely feel localized pain especially with movement, in addition to a palpable mass of muscle tissue. If you have injured your knee, this could cause local swelling, warmth, and redness. This can also occur with arthritis, infection, or conditions such as gout. If you have developed a skin infection such as cellulitis, redness and tenderness would be present. This could be accompanied by an abscess, which might feel like a bump under the skin. Finally, if you have developed a blood clot in the vein, this would cause redness and swelling in the affected leg. If the clot is large and/or superficial, you might be able to feel a "cord-like" structure. An ultrasound of the leg can detect clots, and this test should be performed if there is any asymmetric swelling and redness. I would strongly recommend that you see your primary care physician for further evaluation.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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