ZocdocAnswersIs it possible to have recurring bouts of vertigo after suffering a childhood head concussion?

Question

Is it possible to have recurring bouts of vertigo after suffering a childhood head concussion?

When I was ten years old I got a concussion from falling off my bike and hitting my head. I am now 33 and still experience severe bouts of vertigo a few times a year. The vertigo can last up to a month and then goes away. I am just wondering if this vertigo can be a permanent side effect of the concussion since I never experienced vertigo before hitting my head.

Answer

Thank you for this question. I recommend that you speak with your doctor about this concern. Generally speaking, the short answer is that, yes, your concussion and earlier head trauma could be related to the vertigo that you are experiencing now, but it is not certain that they are. While there is a possibility, it is certainly very hard to know if it is related without quite a bit more information. That piece of information about the injury when you were younger is a good place to start, but you will still need to have a full workup in the normal fashion to find out what is causing your symptoms. A neurologist or a neuro-otologist would both be able to help you answer this question. Some questions about your hearing will also help to suggest a possible source for your vertigo, as any hearing loss would possibly suggest some sort of problem with the inner ear, which can also be a source of balance problems. There are many tests and questions that you could answer that would help to determine what is causing these recurrent bouts of vertigo. Again, please speak with your doctor about this question and your past history so that you can get the answers that you need to feel better.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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