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Why do I sometimes feel a strange sensation in my head when I turn my head to the extreme left?

Sometimes, but not always, when I turn my head to the extreme left, I begin feeling an unusual sensation that is not dizziness; not light-headedness; not painful; but it rapidly grows in intensity and "discomfort" such that after 3 to 5 seconds the sensation is so intense that I can no longer stand it and must turn my head away from the extreme left position. Turning my head to the extreme right does not produce the sensation. No other symptoms accompany the sensation. Due to right-side heart failure and lymphodema (I have not been diagnosed with any other major illnesses), I "live" in a power-lift chair and spend most of my waking hours with my head turned about half-way to the right, to see my TV/computer monitor screen. However, I frequently turn my head, momentarily, to the left during my waking hours, to reach for things, and the great majority of the time I do not experience the troubling sensation.
Thanks for your question. I recommend that you speak with your doctor. While it is impossible to know the answer to your specific question without some more information, including the possibility of some additional testing such as x-rays and CT scans, among others, there is quite a bit of information available from what you have provided. First, the vague imbalance feeling that you seem to describe is similar to what some people describe when they have problems with the nerves and muscles in their necks. This can definitely have a positional component, and so your description of almost always having your head facing a single direction certainly can be contributing. Another possibility is that your blood flow to your brain could be affected based on the position of your head, as there are arteries that run along your spinal column and can be compromised in certain positions depending on a number of other factors. This could be serious. True, room-spinning, vertigo seems to not be exactly what you are describing, but if that is the case then you could consider problems with your ears as well, as the inner ear is responsible for part of the balance mechanism in your body. As you can tell, there are many explanations. Please speak with your doctor.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
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