Make an appointment:
Specialty
(i.e. Dermatologists)
Location

Is there a way to optimize my T3 levels, or am I just destined to have low T3?

I'm a 33 year old female with Graves Disease, took methimozole for 1yr, thyroid responded fine. However, after stopping meds went hyperthyroid again. Throughout the entire year, even when tsh was optimized, my t3 is always just right at the bottom of the normal range. Is there a way to optimize my T3 levels, or am I just destined to have low t3?
If you haven't seen one yet, I would suggest that you schedule an appointment with an endocrinologist so that the two of you can discuss your concerns. The most important number for you to focus on when it comes to regulating your thyroid levels is the TSH. TSH stands for thyroid stimulating hormone, and is the primary regulator of thyroid function in the body. When the body wants more thyroid hormone it increases it's TSH levels. Thus, when TSH levels are high we interpret that as the body being starved for thyroid hormone. Went TSH levels are low, we interpret that as the body experiencing too much thyroid hormone. We do not look at the thyroid hormone itself except in certain circumstances. If someone's TSH is normal, and there is nothing wrong with the pituitary gland in the brain, then there is no reason to believe that the thyroid levels you have or abnormal for you. I would be much more concerned if your T3 levels were within normal limits, but your TSH was really low. That would tell me that you have too much thyroid hormone for your body. Your endocrinologist will titrate your medications to your TSH and not your T4 or T3 levels. Graves' disease is a condition that should be followed by specialist. I would suggest that you schedule an appointment with an endocrinologist so that the two of you can discuss the treatments for this condition and how your thyroid level should be followed longitudinally.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.

Other Endocrinologists