ZocdocAnswersWhat does stomach pain, diarrhea, constipation, nausea and vomiting mean?

Question

What does stomach pain, diarrhea, constipation, nausea and vomiting mean?

Stomach pain since the 28th, began with nausea vomiting, fever and diarrhea, followed by constipation, pain began in the lower regions of my stomach and moved to the upper right part of my stomach. my stomach was bloated, tender to touch and warm. it hurt to lie on my back and I always feel very fatigued as if I am not sleeping at all. Please help.

Answer

I encourage you to visit your doctor immediately. Some of your symptoms are concerning and it is impossible to know exactly what is going on without seeing a doctor who can perform a thorough physical examination, in addition to reviewing your medical history and events leading up to your symptoms. Abdominal pain is a common complaint heard by doctors and can be difficult to diagnose because there are so many organs within the abdomen from which the pain could be coming from. It sounds like most of your pain is now in the upper right abdomen and associated with vomiting, fever, and change in bowel habits. The upper right abdomen is where the gallbladder lives. Your symptoms could be suggestive of cholecystitis, or inflammation of the gallbladder, commonly caused by gallstones. With gallbladder inflammation, you can present with fever, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and pain in the right upper abdomen. The treatment is usually to remove the gallbladder. You could also have inflammation in the common bile duct, which is connected to the gallbladder, due to a gallstone which is stuck within the duct. Another possibility is cholangitis, or infection of the bile duct, which can occur when bacteria that lives in the intestines migrates up in the bile duct where it doesn't belong. This is a medical emergency and can be associated with symptoms such as right upper abdomen pain, fever, and yellowing of the skin and eyes. Please visit your doctor who can help guide the next steps in the management of your pain.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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