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I had a CT scan and an abdominal ultrasound. Do either of these tests show the ovaries?

I recently had a CT scan in the ER for right side pain and found i have a kidney stone (passed it). I also had an abdominal ultrasound because i was having upper abdominal pain.. Im still having pain a little lower now and wondering if either of these test show the ovaries as im very nervous the pain is coming from lower now?
If you feel that you may be having problems with your ovaries, that I would suggest that you schedule an appointment with an OB/GYN. Both a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis and an abdominal ultrasound are capable of seeing the ovaries. However, we do not tend to use either of these tests to look at the ovaries because they do not provide the most high-quality images. When he physician is worried about a problem that might be going on with either of the ovaries, then the typical test of choice is a pelvic ultrasound. This can be done in one of two ways. Sometimes the ultrasound to be placed on the skin above the pelvis and images can be obtained looking down towards the uterus and the ovaries. However, the best image is usually come from a transvaginal ultrasound which is when an ultrasound probe is placed into the vagina and images are obtained in that way. Whenever I am looking for any kind of ovarian problem I always look first using a transvaginal ultrasound. Again, If you feel that you may be having problems with your ovaries, that I would suggest that you schedule an appointment with an OB/GYN. This is the type of physician that is most killed at determining if somebody has a problem with her ovaries and they can perform transvaginal ultrasounds in the office. I should say here that if you did have a kidney stone this can cause quite a bit of pain that might start in the flank but then radiate down in the groin. This can certainly be perceived as ovarian pain. Good luck.
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