ZocdocAnswersCould I have a UTI ?

Question

Could I have a UTI ?

Friday night going into Saturday Morning i drank water more than usual during the night so i got up to pee about 4x at night. I drank about 35oz of water within 2 hrs. On the 4th time i experienced a weird feeling as urine coming out almost mild pain. Ever since then i have experienced the same amount of discomfort when about to begin peeing. No pain afterwards, No dark urine or cloudy urine or burning feeling. I really have a clean diet, exercise 6 day a week and drink about 120 oz of water a day. I was fine Friday but really it all began Friday after hours going into Saturday? I have become worried because it will not go away. What do you think is going on?

Answer

You mentioned that you had a weird sensation almost a mild pain during urination that did not go away. Any pain or discomfort during urination is not normal and should be checked out by a physician. People urinate frequently everyday and it should be a pleasant comfortable feeling. It is possible that you have a urinary tract infection (UTI). Pain when urinating is called dysuria. UTI can occur at the tip of the urethra, where the urine exits, all the way up to the kidneys. If it reaches the kidneys, it is called pyelonephritis. Someone with a UTI can also have lower abdominal pain. You can see your primary care physician to see if they can get a urine sample and test it for any UTI's. Other causes of dysuria could also be from a sexually transmitted infection such as chlamydia and gonorrhea. If you have been sexually active, sometime the only symptom could be dysuria. In men, sometimes they can carry an sexually transmitted disease without having any symptoms. While you visit your primary care doctor, they can use the same urine sample to test for some of the common sexually transmitted diseases. At this point, it is unclear what you have but you should see a physician at your earliest convenience .

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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