ZocdocAnswersDid I have a miscarriage?

Question

Did I have a miscarriage?

I just started birth control for my irregular periods about 3 or four weeks ago. I am sexually active and had sex multiple times before starting the pill. On the last week i chose not to take the pill to avoid my period, i didnt have it the first couple days, but then i was at the store and felt this terrible horrible doubling over pain in my abdomen and underneath my vagina. I then felt this quick rush almost as if i peed myself, when i got home i cheked my pants to find tons of blood and a greysish squishy sack about 4 or 5 inches long. I continued bleeding and threw up that night and the next. Still having pain in my abdomen. Did i maybe have a miscarriage and didnt know i was pregnant? Sense i just started the pill i cant tell if its just my period or not. The sack and the horrible pain is throwing me off

Answer

This definitely sounds like a situation where you should see your primary care physician or OB/GYN right away to make sure that you protect your health. If you are sexually active and not using contraception, it is always possible that you could be pregnant. If you were pregnant prior to starting birth control pills, then starting the pill would not necessarily do anything about a previously existing pregnancy you didn't know about. A spontaneous miscarriage can indeed present with symptoms such as you describe, including abdominal pain, heavy bleeding, passage of tissue, and nausea. If you did have a miscarriage, then it is important to make sure that it was complete and that you aren't still retaining any tissue. This can be associated with significant infection which is why it is important that you see a physician for a complete evaluation. In addition, even if you were not pregnant and this is just a very heavy period, if you were having unprotected sex it is important to make sure that you have not been exposed to any sexually transmitted infections. Although birth control pills can reduce the chance of pregnancy, this will not protect you from sexually transmitted diseases. Your doctor can discuss further testing with you to make sure that you protect your health moving forward.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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