ZocdocAnswersI've been getting these swollen lymph nodes on my neck and under my chin which doesn't hurt. What's wrong with me?

Question

I've been getting these swollen lymph nodes on my neck and under my chin which doesn't hurt. What's wrong with me?

So I been getting these swollen lymph nodes on my neck and under my chin which doesn't hurt. I have no fever, no sore throat, and no diarrhea. I do however have wisdom teeth that are coming in that hurt when I eat. I'm scared it could be H.I.V. I been to the dr and did blood work and they told me I was fine. But they didn't check for stds, what's wrong?

Answer

I am sorry to hear that you have some lymph nodes in your neck and under your chin that have you worried that something bad is going on. I strongly recommend that you see your physician about this issue. Generally speaking, as I'm sure you are aware, lymph nodes are part of your immune system within your body. They function to identify and fight pathogens (things that cause infection and illness), and to help slow or prevent harmful processes (like a cancer) from spreading to another part of the body. Lymph nodes within the head and neck drain specific locations, and thus large lymph nodes within the neck will cause a physician to look specifically at an area to see if there is some kind of process going on. The lymph nodes under your chin (centrally called the level 1A lymph nodes, and laterally underneath your jaw bone called the 1B lymph nodes) drain the oral cavity. For this reason, you should get a focused exam of your oral cavity by a physician that understands head and neck disease processes. I would recommend an Ear Nose and Throat doctor (otolaryngologist). It is good that you had some blood work already that didn't show anything bad. Inflammatory processes (like irritation from your wisdom teeth coming in) can cause lymph node swelling, and that might be all it is. I still recommend that you get checked out and a physician will be able to go through your history to make sure there is not something more worrisome going on.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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