ZocdocAnswersHow do I know if my gallbladder gets bad enough to go to the ER?

Question

How do I know if my gallbladder gets bad enough to go to the ER?

Had blood test. They showed I have chronic pancreantitis. And my liver enzymes are elevated. My dr also thinks my gallbladder is bad. I have had constant pain in my stomach for the last 4 wks. I can't seem to get comfortable in the past 3 days. And I've been constipated for 11 days now.

Answer

There unfortunately is no right answer to your question, so I suggest that you schedule an appointment with your primary care physicians so that you can get further direction. It is not possible for me and it is difficult probably for your doctors to be able tell for sure exactly when you should go to the ED for your symptoms and when you should avoid going to the ED for your symptoms. If we always knew whether or not you needed to go, the emergency departments in this country would be a lot less crowded. The fact that you have pancreatitis, liver enzyme elevation, and that your doctor thinks that you might have a gallbladder problem all point to the need for further evaluation. The one condition that could explain all of these findings is gallstones. If you have gallstones, these can cause pain in the gallbladder, they can cause acute pancreatitis, and elevation in your liver enzymes. Finally, if you are constipated for 11 days, this could certainly be the source of your pain. I suggest that you schedule an appointment with your primary care physicians so that you can get further direction. If you have gallstones, you should have your gallbladder removed surgically. If you have chronic pancreatitis (some elevation for unknown reasons, then you should get a referral to a gastroenterologist. I hope that helps.

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