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Why am I bleeding from my penis, again?

Almost exactly one year ago, I started waking up with blood on my underpants. At first, I thought that it was from my girlfriend. Then, I started bleeding during sex, when I had an erection, or just after urinating. This would happen at random. I went to two doctors about it, but neither were much help. One doctor thought it was an s.t.I. The results came back negative of any sexually transmitted infection. Another doctor, a urologist, suggested a cystoscopy and a check of the prostate. He said they were both fine. Then, miraculously, the bleeding stopped, until now. Last night, while having mundane intercourse, I bled roughly 30cc. This time, it took quite a bit longer for it to stop. I only had a brief instance of pain. I am 26 years old.
So you're right that this is not normal, and I'm glad that you are seeking medical care for this. The key question is where the bleeding is from. From your description is sounds like you're bleeding bright red blood from your penis rather than seeing blood in your urine, which makes a urinary source of bleeding less likely (that would include your bladder, ureters, and kidneys). Given that the bleeding seems to be associated with sexual activity you are most likely having bleeding from the urethra or the prostate, which can be caused by friction or irritation to the organs. Your doctors are right that infections can also cause bleeding, and this can include sexually transmitted infections or infections of the prostate. Cancer of the prostate could also cause bleeding, but given your age this is much less likely. It's a little unclear from your question whether you've had a cystoscopy done, but the cystoscopy, STI testing and prostate exam are all good things to test. I would recommend that you go back to the urologist and explain that you're still having bleeding. They may feel that the bleeding does not represent anything serious, but it would be good to discuss your symptoms again with them to make sure that there's nothing else that they would want to do to work up this problem.
This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.
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