ZocdocAnswersMy left eyelid is slightly supplement puffy underneath, could this a symptom of sinus infection?

Question

My left eyelid is slightly supplement puffy underneath, could this a symptom of sinus infection?

hey I had a sinus infection and was prescribed amoxicillian then felt a little better but still had bad breath and sinus pressure as well as headaches went back to the doctor and was prescribed Zyrtec and z pak and got an anti inflammatory shot doctor said to hold off.png z pak unless I need it now my left eye and eyelid are slightly swollen and uncomfortable is this a sign of infection still so should I take the z pak? please help?

Answer

Sorry to hear that you are having troubles with a bad sinus infection and I recommend that you get evaluated by an ENT. As I'm sure you are aware, there are numerous different sinuses in the adult (I say adult, because some of the sinuses, such as the frontal sinus, are not developed in childhood). There are paired (right and left sided) maxillary sinuses (these are the sinuses deep within your cheekbones), ethmoid sinuses (deep behind your nose), frontal sinuses (in your forehead), and sphenoid sinuses (the deepest sinuses that are below your skull base). These sinuses are all lined with mucosa that creates mucous that in a normal situation catches foreign particles from making it down to your lungs. When you have an inflammatory process (such as a upper respiratory tract infection) the mucosa is swollen, and the mucous can be obstructed from the inflammation. The mucous becomes backed up and under pressure, and ultimately becomes infected. This is what happens in a sinus infection. That is why most ENT's will treat a sinus infection with antibiotics, and steroids. The antibiotics to treat the infection, and the steroids to decrease the mucosal inflammation that led to the mucous backing up in the first place. With that being said, there are some potential very bad complications to sinusitis, such as orbital cellulitis (an infection that has gone from the sinuses into the orbit where the eye is). These are very serious and require hospitalization, and sometimes progress to need emergent surgery. Eye swelling is one of the signs of orbital cellulitis. I recommend that you go get evaluated by an ENT. If you have any vision change, then you should go directly to an emergency department.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Medical professionals who provide responses to health-related questions are intended third party beneficiaries with certain rights under Zocdoc’s Terms of Service.