ZocdocAnswersMy dad got a CT Scan and doctors found 12 tiny nodules all under 5mm in my dad's lungs, and kidney. Is this most likely cancer? And if it is early on do we have a better chance fighting it?

Question

My dad got a CT Scan and doctors found 12 tiny nodules all under 5mm in my dad's lungs, and kidney. Is this most likely cancer? And if it is early on do we have a better chance fighting it?

My dad got a ct scan and doctors found 12 tiny nogules all under 5mm in my dad's lungs, and kidney. some of the nogules the doctor said were calsified, he didn't know about the rest and so we are going to see a specialist. They tested his blood And his blood count and it came back perfect. Is this most likely cancer? and if it is early on do we have a better chance fighting it?

Answer

I recommend that your dad be seen by a pulmonologist. Nodules found on a CT scan of the chest are very common. They are called nodules because we often do not know what they are. In some cases they represent cancer while in others they represent scarring or infection. Because we don't know what they are, they need to be followed with further imaging. If any of the enlarge significantly or become larger than 1 cm then they might warrant biopsy. When there are multiple tiny nodules it is not likely that these represent lung cancer. They could however represent cancer from another site. This is why the need watched. The most likely explanation is that they represent scarring from previous infection. If your dad every lived in the mid-west, then this is most likely scarring from previous histoplasmosis infection. This is a fungus that can cause spots or nodules to show up in the lung that usually become calcified. They are the bane of our existence because while these are benign, they still need followed with repeat imaging. Pulmonary nodules can be followed by different types of physicians, but because your dad has 12 of them it might be beneficial for him to be seen by a pulmonologist. This is a doctor that specializes in the lungs and can follow these nodules longitudinally and decide if anything needs to be done.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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