ZocdocAnswersCan a small thyroid nodule cause symptoms?

Question

Can a small thyroid nodule cause symptoms?

I have been having trouble swallowing, hoarseness, fullness in my throat, and the feeling that my throat occasionally closes when I inhale. I had a small, solid, vascular nodule (5mm) discovered by ultrasound. Is it possible for my symptoms to be caused by a nodule that is that small? Thank you!

Answer

A thyroid nodule of this size is not likely to to be the cause of a these types of symptoms, however it is important to schedule an appointment with an ear nose and throat doctor (ENT). It is true that an enlarged thyroid or a very large thyroid nodule can place pressure on that area of the throat affecting the voice and causing difficulties with swallowing. However, a nodule that is half centimeter is not likely to be symptomatic unless it is an active nodule. Some thyroid nodules release thyroid hormone abnormally and can cause symptoms of hyperthyroidism. These symptoms include weight loss, difficulty sleeping, mood disturbances, and diarrhea. The issues you are experiencing sound to me more like an issue with your larynx which is that part of your throat. The feeling of your throat closing when you inhale sounds like a condition called paradoxical vocal cord closure which can be mistaken for asthma. Other possibilities include acid reflux, and a throat tumor. I suggest that you schedule an appointment with an ear nose and throat doctor (ENT). The reason for this is that your symptoms probably should be evaluated with a fiberoptic laryngoscopy which is a test where the doctor will use s scope to look at your larynx. This can help rule out a lot of problems that could be causing difficulty swelling, hoarseness, and a fullness in your throat.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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