ZocdocAnswersWhat are large red spots on my penis head under foreskin?

Question

What are large red spots on my penis head under foreskin?

On my penis I have these red spots they are rather large. They do no itch,burn,hurt or anything they're just a bit more sensitive. I have had them for as long as I can remember 10 years minimum. I have had them even before I lost my virginity so it can't be a STI/STD or so I believe. I am also uncircumcised. I was having sex a few weeks ago and my female partner asked me about the spots. I never questioned the spots until recently. Also I always wear a condom. Lastly I am quite nervous to ask my doctor about them, even though I know it would be the best thing to do. Any help would be immensely appreciated. I can post a picture if need be.

Answer

There are many causes of penile bumps, which can range from totally normal to quite serious, and, as you mention, the best thing to do would be to ask your doctor. Since you've had the lesions for some time, they are less likely to be infectious as you suggest; however, if you are having sex with multiple partners it is good to get periodic screens for sexually transmitted diseases and HIV even if you regularly wear a condom. Infectious conditions that can cause asymptomatic bumps include genital warts (HPV) and molluscum, neither of which can be treated but are important to diagnose. Non-infectious causes of penile bumps include 'pearly penile papules', which are asymptomatic bumps near the head of the penis that are benign; 'follicular cysts', which are bumps near the hair follicles; and inflammatory conditions including psoriasis and lichen planus which can be treated with topical steroids. In uncircumcised men there is also an increased risk of penile cancer which will often first manifest as pre-cancerous lesions. Good hygiene is extremely important, and additionally, given that these can be caught early, it is very important that you go to a doctor to have these lesions examined. It is natural to be apprehensive about seeing a doctor, but doctors see these kinds of lesions very frequently and it will likely be reassuring to have them examined.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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