ZocdocAnswersWhat could be causing my pregnant wife so much pain after kidney stone removal?

Question

What could be causing my pregnant wife so much pain after kidney stone removal?

She had a ureteroscopy done around noon on Wednesday. Got out of surgery around 1 p.m. and has been in even more pain since. Her kidney stone was lodged. She was on a morphine drip but that didn't cut the pain in any way. They put her on something stronger and it only lasts for about 15 minutes and the pain comes back causing vomitting in some instances. Any idea wtf is going on, because the doctor seems to think it's bladder spasms but that's the only answer I've heard. She has not been released from the hospital and has been there for 2 days. She had the surgery on the 2nd day.

Answer

So sorry to hear about the pain that your wife is in. There are many different things that can be done to help with the pain, but of course her doctors are trying to be careful and the situation is likely made more difficult because she is also pregnant. So they have to worry about both the health of your wife and the health of her baby. I recommend discussing this issue further with them. As for what could be causing the pain, bladder spasms is one possible explanation. Again, doctors have to be careful in treating that as some of the medications that are commonly used to relax these spasms can cross over to the baby. Most of these medications have not been extensively studied in pregnancy, and so doctors always try to use caution. As for other causes, some potential ideas include contractions that could have been stimulated with the surgery, kidney pain from the procedure, abdominal pain caused by the manipulations during the surgery, infections that could be ongoing, or even a retained stone. All of these are just some ideas as well, but your doctors will have more information available. You should discuss your concerns with them and ask for more information. Please speak with her doctors.

This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice.

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